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Aug
27
2014

Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Pacific / Indian Oceans

Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie) remains active in the northeastern Pacific…located approximately 880 miles west of the southern tip of Baja California – Category 1 hurricane

Here’s a fairly recent NASA satellite image of this tropical cyclone…along with now retired post-tropical cyclone Karina to the southwest

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclone Marie

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclone Marie

Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie)  continues to weaken, and has slipped to a category 1 hurricane…after peaking at category 5 three days ago.

Wind speeds at the time of this advisory #23 were 75 mph sustained…with higher gusts. The NHC forecast strongly suggests that this hurricane will be downgraded to a tropical storm as early as later today…and then to a tropical depression within the next 24-48 hours.

According to the NHC, thunderstorm cloud tops associated with weakening Marie continue to warm, and recent imagery shows the inner core thunderstorms becoming less organized.

Marie will be moving over progressively cooler sea water, and into a more stable environment during the next 24 to 36 hours. This should result in continued weakening, and Marie is forecast to become a post-tropical cyclone within 36 hours.

A west-northwestward motion should continue today, followed by a turn toward the northwest. After the system becomes shallow, it is expected to turn westward and then west-southwestward in northeasterly low-level flow.

Very large southerly swells continue to pound much of the Baja California Peninsula, and the southern California coast. These swells are expected to persist for another day or so and are likely to produce life-threatening surf and rip currents, as well as minor coastal flooding around the time of high tide.

The following is from the NWS office in Los Angeles:

A HIGH SURF ADVISORY REMAINS IN EFFECT FOR MAINLY EXPOSED SOUTH FACING SHORES SOUTH OF POINT CONCEPTION THROUGH FRIDAY.

SURF HEIGHTS TO 15 FEET ARE POSSIBLE IN THE MOST SUSCEPTIBLE LOCATIONS OF L.A. AND VENTURA COUNTIES TODAY.

SURF CONDITIONS WILL BE VERY DANGEROUS…EVEN FOR EXPERIENCED SURFERS AND SWIMMERS.

THERE WILL LIKELY BE LOCAL FLOODING OF SUSCEPTIBLE LOW LYING AREAS NEAR THE TIME OF HIGH TIDE LATE THIS MORNING. SWELLS FROM HURRICANE MARIE WILL CONTINUE TO IMPACT THE EXPOSED SOUTH FACING SHORES NORTH OF POINT CONCEPTION AS WELL. THERE WILL BE A HIGH RISK OF VERY DANGEROUS RIP CURRENTS ON ALL AREA BEACHES THROUGH FRIDAY.

Here’s a satellite image of  hurricane Marie…along with what the computer models are showing.

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation

Meanwhile, there’s an area of disturbed weather in the south China Sea, being referred to as Invest 99W…located about 122 NM east-southeast of Hainan Island, China.

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), shows fragmented although formative cloud bands, feeding in from the south…into a low level circulation center.

Upper level analysis indicates that the system is south of a high pressure ridge…in an area of low to moderately strong wind shear, and good westerly outflow.

Computer models don’t develop this disturbance however.

Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated to be 15-20 knots (17-23 mph).

Due to the weak consolidation, and the landfall over Hainan Island that will soon occur, the JTWC is giving this disturbance a low chance of developing.

The associated thunderstorms will bring heavy rainfall to the area, along with  localized flooding…and gusty winds too.

Here’s a satellite image of this area.

 

Eastern North Pacific

Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie)

NHC textual forecast
NHC graphical track map
NOAA satellite image
Pacific Disaster Center’s Global Hazards Atlas


Eastern Pacific Satellite Image


Here’s the northeast Pacific’s
Sea Surface Temperatures

Central North Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Latest Central Pacific Satellite Image

Here’s the central Pacific’s Sea Surface Temperatures

Western North Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface temperatures for this area of the NW Pacific

South Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for this area of the South Pacific

North Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the North Indian Ocean

South Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the South Indian Ocean

North Arabian Sea

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the North Arabian Sea

Aug
27
2014

Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Atlantic Ocean / Caribbean Sea / Gulf of Mexico

Tropical Cyclone 04L (Cristobal) remains active in the Atlantic Ocean…located approximately 435 miles west of Bermuda, 300 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina – Category 1 Hurricane

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclone Cristobal

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclone Cristobal

Hurricane 04L (Cristobal) continues to gradually strengthen…passing well offshore to the northwest of Bermuda

Hurricane Cristobal’s maximum sustained winds were near 80 mph…reaching 85 mph over the next two days.

According to the NHC, some deep thunderstorm activitiy has redeveloped near the center of Cristobal during the past few hours, mainly in the western semicircle. Satellite imagery shows dry air wrapping south and east of the center, interspersed with a couple of convective bands. The initial intensity remains 80 mph, and another aircraft will be investigating the cyclone this afternoon.

There is still some potential for Cristobal to strengthen during the next day or so, before it begins extra-tropical transition, which should be complete shortly after 48 hours. Cristobal is expected to be a powerful extra-tropical cyclone by Friday night or Saturday…and then slowly weaken before being absorbed by another cyclone at the end of the period.

All of the computer model guidance is unanimous in turning Cristobal north-northeastward and then northeastward during the next 24 hours, and accelerating this tropical cyclone into the mid-latitude prevailing westerlies. A continued northeasterly motion is expected through the remainder of the cyclone’s life cycle.

Open ocean vessels should be giving this hurricane a wide berth, as dangerous conditions exist along its path.


HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND
----------------------
SURF...SWELLS GENERATED BY CRISTOBAL ARE AFFECTING BERMUDA AND
PORTIONS OF THE U.S. EAST COAST FROM NORTH CAROLINA NORTHWARD TO
THE MID-ATLANTIC STATES...AND WILL SPREAD NORTHWARD TO SOUTHERN NEW
ENGLAND TOMORROW. THESE SWELLS ARE LIKELY TO CAUSE LIFE-THREATENING
SURF AND RIP CURRENT CONDITIONS. FOR MORE INFORMATION...PLEASE
CONSULT PRODUCTS FROM YOUR LOCAL WEATHER OFFICE.

RAINFALL...CRISTOBAL IS EXPECTED TO PRODUCE ADDITIONAL RAINFALL
AMOUNTS OF 1 TO 2 INCHES OVER BERMUDA.

WIND...TROPICAL STORM CONDITIONS ARE POSSIBLE ON BERMUDA LATER
TODAY AND TONIGHT.

Here’s the current NOAA satellite image of this storm…along with what the computer models are showing.

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

Meanwhile, there’s a tropical disturbance located about 600 miles east of the Lesser Antilles…the general motion will continue to be west at near 15 mph.

This area, being referred to as Invest 97L, will likely remain over the western Atlantic Ocean until Friday or so. The current path and speed of motion will likely bring this disturbance over the Lesser Antilles, and then on into the western Caribbean by Saturday. This in turn will bring increasing rains to the Caribbean Islands upon its arrival.

There’s a very low zero percent chance of this cyclone spinning-up into a tropical cyclone over the next two days. The NHC suggests that chances will increase to a slightly higher 10% over the next five days.

Here’s  what the computer models are showing, along with a satellite image of this area.

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation

Finally, there’s an area of disturbed weather in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, which is being referred to as Invest 98L…having a low chance of developing.

The distinguishing feature of this disturbance is the thunderstorm activity, which has increased this morning.

Some of the computer models are showing this area low pressure moving towards the far southern Texas coast, which would bring heavy rainfall to that area…and the northern Mexico region as well.

Here’s a satellite image of this area…along with what the computer models are showing.

Tropical Weather Outlook

NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC…CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO…

NHC graphical Tropical Weather Outlook Map

Atlantic Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 04L (Cristobal)

NHC textual forecast
NHC graphical track map
NOAA satellite image
Pacific Disaster Center’s Global Hazards Atlas

1.)  A tropical wave located about 600 miles east of the Lesser Antilles continues to produce disorganized cloudiness and showers. This system is now expected to move generally westward across the Caribbean Sea with little development during the next few days. However, environmental conditions could become favorable for some development by early next week in the western Caribbean Sea or southern Gulf of Mexico.

* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...near 0 percent 
* Formation chance through 5 days...low...10 percent 

NOAA satellite image of the Atlantic

Caribbean Sea

There are no active tropical cyclones

WSI satellite image of the Caribbean Sea

Gulf of Mexico

There are no active tropical cyclones

1.)  Shower and thunderstorm activity associated with a weak low pressure area located over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico has increased during the past few hours. Some additional development is possible before the system moves inland over southern Texas and northern Mexico on Thursday. An Air Force Reserve Hurricane Hunter aircraft is scheduled to investigate this system later today, if necessary.

* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...20 percent.
* Formation chance through 5 days...low...20 percent.

Latest satellite image of the Gulf of Mexico

Aug
26
2014

Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Pacific / Indian Oceans

Tropical Cyclone 11E (Karina) remains active in the northeast Pacific…located approximately 1210 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja CaliforniaTropical Depression

Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie) remains active in the northeastern Pacific…located approximately 605 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja California – Category 2 hurricane

Here’s a NASA satellite image of these two tropical cyclones

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclones Karina and Marie

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclones Karina and Marie

Tropical Cyclone 11E (Karina) is rapidly weakening…as the outflow of air from Hurricane Marie is taking its toll

At the time of this writing, and based on NHC advisory #55, tropical depression Karina had maximum sustained winds of only near 30 mph.

According to the NHC, Karina has weakened overnight and has lost any associated deep convection. Although deep convection could re-develop today, increasing easterly wind shear associated with the outflow of Hurricane Marie…should make it difficult for any new convective growth to persist.

Within 24 hours, this tropical cyclone is expected to dissipate into a trough of low pressure, well south of hurricane Marie. The initial motion estimate is slowly southeastward at near 2 mph. Karina is expected to rotate around the southern portion of the circulation of Hurricane Marie over the next day…until it’s absorbed.

Here’s a satellite image of Karina…along with what the computer models are showing.


Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie)
  has now slipped down to a category 2 hurricane…after reaching category 5 two days ago.

Wind speeds at the time of this advisory #19 were 100 mph sustained…with higher gusts.

According to the NHC, steady weakening of Marie is expected with the cyclone now moving over much colder sea waters. Marie should become a post-tropical cyclone in about 2 days, although there will likely still be gale force winds for some time after this transition.

Computer model guidance agree on a west-northwestward to northwestward motion during the next few days. Hurricane Marie should slow and turn toward the north-northwest by day 4. The remnants of the cyclone are then expected to drift westward thereafter…within an area of light steering currents.

Meanwhile, very large southerly swells continue to affect much of the Baja California peninsula, and will soon reach the southern California beaches. These swells are expected to persist for a couple of days, and could produce life-threatening surf and rip currents…as well as minor coastal flooding around the time of high tide.

A High Surf Advisory is in effect for Los Angeles County, where waves of 10-15 feet will likely cause damage to piers and beach side property…as well as significant beach erosion. This dangerous surf will be accompanied by strong rip currents and long shore currents…making for very hazardous swimming and surfing conditions through Thursday.

Marie’s tropical storm-force winds covered a large area of ocean, up to 275 miles from the center, and 12-foot high seas extended up to 500+ miles from the center.

However, Marie won’t be affecting land with strong winds or heavy rains.

Here’s a satellite image of  hurricane Marie…along with what the computer models are showing.

Eastern North Pacific

Tropical Cyclone 11E (Karina)

NHC textual forecast
NHC graphical track map
NOAA satellite image
Pacific Disaster Center’s Global Hazards Atlas

Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie)
NHC textual forecast
NHC graphical track map
NOAA satellite image
Pacific Disaster Center’s Global Hazards Atlas


Eastern Pacific Satellite Image


Here’s the northeast Pacific’s
Sea Surface Temperatures

Central North Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Latest Central Pacific Satellite Image

Here’s the central Pacific’s Sea Surface Temperatures

Western North Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface temperatures for this area of the NW Pacific

South Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for this area of the South Pacific

North Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the North Indian Ocean

South Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the South Indian Ocean

North Arabian Sea

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the North Arabian Sea

Aug
26
2014

Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Atlantic Ocean / Caribbean Sea / Gulf of Mexico

Tropical Cyclone 04L (Cristobal) remains active in the Atlantic Ocean…located approximately 545 miles southwest of Bermuda – Category 1 Hurricane

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclone Cristobal

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclone Cristobal

Hurricane 04L (Cristobal) continues to gradually strengthen, having become the 3rd hurricane of the 2014 season…as it moves out to sea

Hurricane Cristobal’s maximum sustained winds were near 75 mph, with further strengthening expected over the next two days.

According to the NHC, the center of Cristobal is partially exposed to the northwest of the deep convection. Analyses shows about 23 mph west-northwesterly wind shear over Cristobal, and dry air has wrapped into the southwestern quadrant of the circulation.

The initial intensity remains 65 knots based on data from the last NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft mission.

Model guidance indicates that the upper-level winds will become less hostile during the next day or so…which should allow for some intensification.

The NHC forecast shows Cristobal peaking in 36-48 hours. After that time, Cristobal will be moving over cooler waters, and into a higher wind shear environment, which should result in the system losing tropical characteristics in about 3 days.  This should result in Cristobal transitioning to a powerful extra-tropical cyclone over the north Atlantic late in the period.

During the next day or so Cristobal will begin moving north-northeastward around the western side of the Atlantic subtropical ridge. Then the cyclone should accelerate into the mid-latitude prevailing westerlies during the remainder of the forecast period.

Cristobal continues to dump heavy rains over the Central and Southeast Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands. At this point, the only land area at risk from hurricane Cristobal is Bermuda, and the latest wind probability forecast from NHC…gives that island a 27% chance of experiencing tropical storm force winds of 39+ mph.

Here’s the current NOAA satellite image of this storm…along with what the computer models are showing.

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

Meanwhile, there’s a tropical disturbance located about 900 miles east of the Lesser Antilles . The general motion will continue to be west to west-northwest at near 15 mph.

The principal limiting factor today, as it was yesterday, is the dry air surrounding the area, as shown on this graphical map…especially to the north. At the same time, sea surface temperatures are amply warm to support formation, although the wind shear over this area remains in the moderately strong category.

It will likely remain over the open Atlantic Ocean until Friday or so. The current path and speed of motion will likely bring this disturbance over the Lesser Antilles by Friday, and then on towards Puerto Rico by Saturday. This in turn will bring increasing rains to the Caribbean Islands.

There’s a very low zero percent chance of this cyclone spinning-up into a tropical cyclone over the next two days. However, the NHC suggests that chances will increase to near 20% over the next five days.

Here’s  what the computer models are showing, along with a satellite image of this area.

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

Finally, there’s a new area of disturbed weather in the Gulf of Mexico, although it has a low chance of developing.

The distinguishing feature of this disturbance is the thunderstorm activity, although that has become less active.

Some of the computer models are showing a weak area of low pressure moving towards the Texas Gulf coast…which would bring rainfall.

Here’s a satellite image of this area.

 

Tropical Weather Outlook

NWS TPC/NATIONAL HURRICANE CENTER MIAMI FL

FOR THE NORTH ATLANTIC…CARIBBEAN SEA AND THE GULF OF MEXICO…

NHC graphical Tropical Weather Outlook Map

Atlantic Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 04L (Cristobal)

NHC textual forecast
NHC graphical track map
NOAA satellite image
Pacific Disaster Center’s Global Hazards Atlas

1.)  A tropical wave located about 900 miles east of the Lesser Antilles continues to produce disorganized showers and a few thunderstorms. Environmental conditions are not expected to be favorable for significant development during the next couple of days, but could become more conducive by the end of the week or this weekend while the system moves westward to west-northwestward at about 15 mph.

* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...near 0 percent 
* Formation chance through 5 days...low...20 percent 

NOAA satellite image of the Atlantic

Caribbean Sea

There are no active tropical cyclones

WSI satellite image of the Caribbean Sea

Gulf of Mexico

There are no active tropical cyclones

1.) Disorganized showers and thunderstorms over the northern Gulf of
Mexico are associated with a trough of low pressure.  Upper-level
winds are not expected to be conducive for significant development
while the system moves to the west-southwest at 5 to 10 mph.
* Formation chance through 48 hours...low...10 percent.
* Formation chance through 5 days...low...10 percent.

Latest satellite image of the Gulf of Mexico

Aug
25
2014

Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Pacific / Indian Oceans

Tropical Cyclone 11E (Karina) remains active in the northeast Pacific…located approximately 1240 miles west-southwest of the southern tip of Baja CaliforniaTropical Depression

Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie) remains active in the northeastern Pacific…located approximately 470 miles southwest of the southern tip of Baja California – Category 4 hurricane

Here’s a good NASA satellite image of these two tropical cyclones

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclones Karina and Marie

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Positions and Segments, and Estimated Winds (TAOS Model) layers for Tropical Cyclones Karina and Marie

Tropical Cyclone 11E (Karina) is rapidly weakening…as the outflow of air from Hurricane Marie is affecting Karina

At the time of this writing, and based on NHC advisory #51, tropical depression Karina had maximum sustained winds near 35 mph, with higher gusts.

According to the NHC, the upper-level outflow from Hurricane Marie is strongly shearing Karina, as only a small portion of the associated deep convection remains in the southwestern quadrant of the cyclone.

Despite the system heading toward warmer waters, hostile wind shear should cause Karina to become a remnant low in about 12 hours. Thereafter, Karina’s remnant low should become absorbed within the circulation of the much larger Marie in about two days.

Karina is moving toward the east-southeast at 10 mph. This tropical cyclone will be drawn towards the large circulation of hurricane Marie until absorption of Karina occurs.

The strongest thunderstorms associated with TD Karina are quickly dissipating. The strongest of these thunderstorms were located to the west-northwest of the center, pushed there by wind shear from the east-southeast. 

Here’s a satellite image of Karina…along with what the computer models are showing.


Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie)
reached a very impressive category 5 on Sunday…and has now slipped a little to category 4 today

Here’s a rapid-scan loop of this powerful hurricane…from NOAA’s Regional and Mesoscale Meteorology Branch.

Wind speeds at the time of this advisory #15 were 145 mph sustained…with higher gusts. During the day yesterday (Sunday) Marie was maintaining Category 5 winds of 160 mph for six hours!

According to the NHC, the area of the coldest cloud tops surrounding Marie’s eye has been gradually shrinking in size, while the eye has started to cool…however Marie is still a powerful hurricane.

A satellite pass indicated that Marie still has a concentric eyewall structure, so an eyewall replacement has not yet occurred. Internal dynamics, especially this continued potential of an eyewall replacement, will likely influence Marie’s intensity during the next 24 hours. After that time, quick weakening is expected since Marie will be moving over much cooler sea surface temperatures.

Marie has turned northwestward with an initial motion of northwest at 13 mph. Mid-level ridging to the north and northeast of the hurricane is expected to steer Marie on a northwestward or west-northwestward heading through day 4.

Although Marie is expected to remain well offshore, Marie’s tropical storm-force winds cover a huge area of ocean, up to 310 miles from the center. Thus, very large swells will continue to affect southwestern Mexico through tonight and much of the Pacific coast of the Baja California peninsula during the next few days. Southerly swells will also reach the coast of southern California by Tuesday…producing life-threatening surf and rip currents, as well as minor coastal flooding.

A High Surf Advisory is in effect for Los Angeles County beacbes, where waves of 10-15 feet will potentially cause structural damage to piers and beach side property…as well as significant beach erosion. The powerful surf will be accompanied by strong rip currents and long-shore currents, making for very hazardous swimming and surfing conditions. According to NWS office in San Diego, California.

Here’s a satellite image of  hurricane Marie…along with what the computer models are showing.

 

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying 3 hour precipitation accumulation…Global Clouds

Meanwhile, there’s a tropical disturbance in the northwest Pacific…although it has a low chance of developing

This area of disturbed weather is located about 775 NM east of Tokyo, Japan, and being referred to as Invest 98W.

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) satellite imagery shows that an elongated low level circulation has been moving to the east-northeast.

Sea surface temperatures are in a marginally favorable range. However, computer models suggest a weakening of this circulation…as it begins to more more northerly.

Maximum sustained winds are estimated to be 10-15 knots.

The unfavorable environmental conditions are keeping this disturbance with a low chance of developing…over the open ocean.

Here’s a satellite image of this area of disturbed weather.

 

Eastern North Pacific

Tropical Cyclone 11E (Karina)

NHC textual forecast
NHC graphical track map
NOAA satellite image
Pacific Disaster Center’s Global Hazards Atlas

Tropical Cyclone 13E (Marie)
NHC textual forecast
NHC graphical track map
NOAA satellite image
Pacific Disaster Center’s Global Hazards Atlas


Eastern Pacific Satellite Image


Here’s the northeast Pacific’s
Sea Surface Temperatures

Central North Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Latest Central Pacific Satellite Image

Here’s the central Pacific’s Sea Surface Temperatures

Western North Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface temperatures for this area of the NW Pacific

South Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for this area of the South Pacific

North Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the North Indian Ocean

South Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the South Indian Ocean

North Arabian Sea

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

Here’s the Sea Surface Temperatures for the North Arabian Sea

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