CURRENT TROPICAL CYCLONES:

Tropical Cyclone 01B (Amphan) is located approximately 25 NM south-southwest of Kolkata, India – Final Warning

  https://www.metoc.navy.mil/jtwc/products/abpwsair.jpg   Tropical Cyclone 01B (Amphan) is an extremely dangerous storm, which is bringing flooding rainfall, high surf, high winds…and a large storm surge to a highly populated low elevation area Sustained winds of 75 knots, with gusts to 90 knots…as of Warning 17 Radar loop of TC Amphan reaching the coast Here’s a storm storm graphic of the storms approach to the coast…and inland Here’s what the computer models are showing According to the JTWC, satellite imagery shows a weakened system that still retains tightly wrapped banding despite no longer presenting a visible eye. TC 01B is tracking through a generally favorable environment with low to moderate 15-20 knot wind shear, very warm sea surface temperatures…and fair poleward outflow. TC Amphan is expected to continue weakening due to high 25-30 knot wind shear and a deteriorating upper level environment, until it makes landfall shortly before 24 hours. Dissipation is expected before 48 hours due to high >25 knot wind shear and terrain interaction. Indian Meteorology Department…Cyclone Bangladesh Meteorological Department…Cyclone     There’s a tropical disturbance, being referred to as Invest 98S, which is located approximately 430 NM northwest of Cocos Island, Australia Here’s what the computer model is showing According to the JTWC, satellite imagery shows a broad low level circulation, with fragmented deep convection scattered around the periphery. Environmental analysis reveals the disturbance is in a favorable environment, with good poleward outflow, warm sea surface temperatures…and low <15 knot wind shear. Global models indicate that 98S will track southward while consolidating and intensifying. Maximum sustained surface winds are estimated at 20-25 knots. The potential for the development of a significant tropical cyclone within the next 24 hours is upgraded to high.     https://www.nrlmry.navy.mil/htdocs_dyn_apache/PUBLIC/sat_pages/thumbs/java/pacific/eastern/pacus/ir/100_20200519.1730.goes17.ir.x.pacus.x.jpg

Northeast Pacific

There are no active tropical cyclones Tropical cyclone formation is not expected during the next 5 days

Central North Pacific

There are no active tropical cyclones PDC will resume production of these daily reports when the 2020 hurricane season begins again on June 1st. 2019 Hurricane Season Summary for the Central Pacific Basin The 2019 hurricane season featured five tropical cyclones in the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC) area of responsibility, which is near the season average. Hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30. The Central Pacific basin extends from 140°W to the International Date Line. Four to five tropical cyclones occur during an average year. Hurricane Erick was the first tropical cyclone of the season in the Central Pacific, moving into the basin from the east on July 30. Erick rapidly intensified to a major hurricane (category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale) later that day, then steadily weakened as it passed far south of the main Hawaiian Islands. Tropical Storm Flossie entered the basin on August 3 and approached Hawaii from the east, eventually dissipating before reaching the islands. Tropical Depression 12-E entered the basin on September 4 and strengthened to Tropical Storm Akoni. Akoni was the first tropical cyclone to be named from the Central Pacific list of names since Hurricane Walaka in 2018. Tropical Depression Kiko entered the basin on September 24 and immediately dissipated. Tropical Storm Ema, the second cyclone to be named from the Central Pacific list of names, developed southwest of the main Hawaiian Islands on October 12. Ema dissipated over the southern portion of the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument shortly before crossing between French Frigate Shoals and Maro Reef. Impacts to the State of Hawaii: Swells from Tropical Cyclone Barbara, which dissipated just before crossing into the Central Pacific basin, led to high surf along east facing shores of the state during July 6-9. Remnant moisture from Barbara also led to heavy rain across Maui and Hawaii Counties during July 8-11. Swells generated by Tropical Cyclones Erick and Flossie led to high surf along east and south facing shores during August 1-6. Moisture associated with Erick also contributed to heavy rain over Hawaii County on August 2, and across Kauai County during August 4-5. Hurricane Season Outlook: NOAA’s 2019 hurricane season outlook issued on May 22, 2019, called for five to eight tropical cyclones in the Central Pacific basin, with a 70% chance of above-normal tropical cyclone activity, a 20% chance of near-normal activity, and a 10% chance of below-normal activity. The 2019 season started with an El Niño event that was expected to last through the fall. Instead, steady cooling commenced early in the summer leading to neutral conditions by the heart of the hurricane season.

Western North Pacific

There are no active tropical cyclones Satellite image of this area

South Pacific

There are no active tropical cyclones Satellite image of this area

North Indian Ocean

Tropical Cyclone 01B (Amphan) JTWC textual warning JTWC graphical map Satellite image of this area

South Indian Ocean

There are no active tropical cyclones Satellite image of this area

Arabian Sea

There are no active tropical cyclones Satellite image of this area   For real-time information on current disasters download PDC’s free Disaster Alert mobile app available for your iOS or Android wwwices today! Also be sure to monitor PDC on Twitter, Facebook, and by accessing the web-accessible Disaster Alert from your computer, phone, or tablet.