CURRENT TROPICAL CYCLONES:
Tropical Cyclone 13L (Laura)…is located is located 250 miles northeast of Memphis, Tennessee
  Atlantic Ocean:   A tropical wave located about 600 miles east of the Windward Islands is producing disorganized showers and thunderstorms. Some gradual development of this system is possible during the next several days while it moves westward at about 15 mph toward the Lesser Antilles. Regardless of development, this system will likely produce gusty winds and locally heavy rainfall across portions of the Windward and Leeward Islands on Sunday. * Formation chance through 48 hours…low…20 percent * Formation chance through 5 days…low…30 percent >>> Another tropical wave is located over the eastern Atlantic Ocean just southwest of the Cabo Verde Islands. This system is expected to move very slowly for the next several days, and some development is possible early next week over the eastern or central tropical Atlantic. * Formation chance through 48 hours…low…near 0 percent * Formation chance through 5 days…low…40 percent Here’s a satellite image of the Atlantic Ocean Gulf of Mexico:  Tropical Cyclone 13L (Laura) https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/xgtwo/two_atl_2d0.png LAURA CONTINUING TO LOSE TROPICAL CHARACTERISTICS…FLOOD THREAT CONTINUES INTO SATURDAY…A FEW TORNADOES REMAIN POSSIBLE According to the NHC Advisory 37…The depression is moving toward the east-northeast near 21 mph (33 km/h) and this motion is expected to continue through the evening. Maximum sustained winds are near 30 mph (45 km/h) with higher gusts. Eventually, the remains of Laura will cross the central Appalachians Saturday, before becoming absorbed by an approaching cold front that is forecast to move off the mid-Atlantic coastline by late Saturday. HAZARDS AFFECTING LAND RAINFALL: Additional rainfall of 1 to 3 inches, with maximum amounts to 5 inches forecast across western and central Kentucky and Tennessee, and south into northern Alabama and Mississippi. One to 2 inches, with isolated totals to 4 inches will be possible over southern Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. One to 3 inches possible over the central and southern Appalachians and the mid-Atlantic states through Saturday. This rainfall will continue to cause isolated flash and urban flooding, and small streams and creeks to overflow their banks across the aforementioned regions. Minor to moderate river flooding is occurring or forecast in Louisiana, Arkansas, and northern Mississippi. WIND: Gusty winds will accompany the tropical depression as it moves along the Lower Ohio Valley through tonight. TORNADOES: A few tornadoes remain possible overnight, mainly over the Tennessee Valley. The risk for a couple of tornadoes should redevelop Saturday afternoon and evening over parts of the mid-Atlantic from Virginia to North Carolina.   https://cdn.star.nesdis.noaa.gov//GOES16/ABI/SECTOR/GM/GEOCOLOR/GOES16-GM-GEOCOLOR-1000x1000.gif https://www.nhc.noaa.gov/storm_graphics/AT13/refresh/AL132020_5day_cone_with_line_and_wind+png/151358_5day_cone_with_line_and_wind.png https://www.tropicaltidbits.com/storminfo/13L_tracks_latest.png