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Mar
28
2017

Tropical Cyclone Activity Report – Pacific / Indian Oceans

Tropical Cyclone 13P (Debbie) is dissipating…located about 108 NM southeast of Townsville, Australia – Final Warning

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Segments, Positions, and PDC Active Hazards for Tropical Cyclone 13P (Debbie)

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying Tropical Cyclone Segments, Positions, and PDC Active Hazards for Tropical Cyclone 13P (Debbie)

Tropical Cyclone 13S (Debbie) has made landfall along the northeast coast of Queensland…and is moving further inland

Here’s a NASA satellite image showing TC Debbie as she made landfall along the Queensland coast. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology noted wind gusts stronger than 160 mph (260 kph) were recorded near landfall.

The strong winds downed trees and power lines. Power losses occurred in a large area between the towns of Bowen and Mackay, according to Ergon Energy. The Townsville airport and ocean ports were closed.

The massive storm made landfall near Airlie Beach midday Tuesday (local time) as a Category 4 equivalent storm. Some 40,000 homes and businesses were in the dark as Debbie moved ashore, the Australian Broadcasting Company reported.

So far, one injury has been reported. A man in Prosperine was hospitalized after a wall collapsed, ABC said. Major damage has been reported in that town, but those reports are preliminary.

One of the biggest problems facing emergency officials in the immediate aftermath is the lack of phone service and electricity, that has made it difficult to fully assess the damage along Australia’s northeast coast, according to the New York Times.

“We’re starting to see it where they’re actually losing communication, and that’s the biggest problem for us — because we just don’t know how many people are injured, the status of their homes,” Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk told the Times.

Prior to the storm’s arrival, 1,000 people were deployed to Queensland to help with disaster relief, the Times also reported. The army remains on standby as well.

Minister for Police, Fire and Emergency Services Mark Ryan declared a disaster situation, according to the Courier Mail. Despite warnings, some residents said they would rather ride the storm out at home than evacuate.

In total, more than 25,000 left their homes ahead of the storm, BBC.com reported.

Here’s the latest NOAA satellite image of this system…and what the computer models are showing

Here’s a near real-time wind profile of TC 13P

Here’s a youtube video of this very large storm…taken from the International Space Station

According to the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), radar imagery from Townsville indicates TC Debbie has made landfall, and is moving further insland.

The intensity of this strong tropical system is deduced from nearby surface observations. Debbie is expected to rapidly decay, as it interacts with the rugged terrain…dissipating within 24 hours.

Maximum sustained winds as of the JTWC Warning #8 were 75 knots with gusts of 90 knots.

Although the peak winds near Debbie’s center are weakening rapidly, heavy rainfall is expected to continue across the region for the next 12 to 24 hours, gradually moving southward with the system.”

TC Debbie was the most powerful storm to make landfall in Queensland since TC Yasi in 2011.

 

Eastern North Pacific

The eastern Pacific hurricane season officially ended on November 30, 2016. Therefore, the last regularly scheduled tropical weather outlook of the 2016 hurricane season has occurred. During the off-season, special tropical weather outlooks will be issued as conditions warrant. The Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) will begin coverage of the eastern Pacific again on May 15, 2017.

Here’s the NOAA 2016 Hurricane Season Summary for the Eastern Pacific Basin

Central North Pacific

The central north Pacific hurricane season officially ended on November 30, 2016. Therefore, the last regularly scheduled tropical weather outlook of the 2016 hurricane season has occurred. During the off-season, special tropical weather outlooks will be issued as conditions warrant. The Pacific Disaster Center (PDC) will begin coverage of the central Pacific again on June 1, 2017.

Here’s the NOAA 2016 Hurricane Season Summary for the Central Pacific Basin

Satellite image of this area

Western North Pacific

There are no current tropical cyclones

South Pacific

Tropical Cyclone 13P (Debbie) Final Warning

JTWC textual forecast
JTWC graphical track map
NOAA satellite Image

Satellite image of this area

North Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

South Indian Ocean

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

North Arabian Sea

There are no current tropical cyclones

Satellite image of this area

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