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Nov
14
2013

Hazard Highlights

Super Typhoon Haiyan

The situational awareness products above show the estimated impact of Super Typhoon Haiyan crossing the central Philippines (left) and making landfall in northern Vietnam (right).

The situational awareness products above show the estimated impact of Super Typhoon Haiyan crossing the central Philippines (left) and making landfall in northern Vietnam (right).

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying recent earthquakes and 7-day rain accumulation to November 13 in the area affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan.

PDC Global Hazards Atlas displaying recent earthquakes and 7-day rain accumulation to November 13 in the area affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan.

In the image above, you can see the accumulated rainfall associated with Super Typhoon Haiyan (called Yolanda in the Philippines). Below we will look a little more closely at the impacts of the Typhoon in both the Philippines and Vietnam. First, take a look at the same Atlas screenshot with the rainfall layer turned off.

Sometimes it is easier to understand the scale of a cyclone by looking at the affected area as a clean map, without the storm effects, before or after seeing the impact layers.

Sometimes it is easier to understand the scale of a cyclone by looking at the affected area as a clean map, without the storm effects, before or after seeing the impact layers.

Haiyan (Yolanda) in the Philippines

PDC developed this map product showing the number of damaged houses by municipality based on a situational report produced by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council of the Philippines. In areas of the darkest red, from 7,000 to 18,800 houses were damaged or destroyed.

PDC developed this map product showing the number of damaged houses by municipality based on a situational report produced by the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council of the Philippines. In areas of the darkest red, from 7,000 to 18,800 houses were damaged or destroyed.

The United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UN OCHA) Situation Report No. 7 published “as of” November 14 on ReliefWeb describes the destruction created by Haiyan, based on reliable reports, including an OCHA Emergency Relief Coordinator’s visit (noted in Situation Report No. 7) to “the most affected areas of Tacloban City.” The situation report states that an estimated 11.8 million people were affected by Haiyan and that 921,200 people are displaced, with 243,600 houses destroyed.  Among the urgent needs, these recent reports list trucks, fuel, food distribution, emergency shelter material, hygiene kits, body bags, and establishing a family tracing service.

There is a “Haiyan Action Plan,” which is reportedly 19 percent funded.

By November 13, OCHA reporting “about 25 international humanitarian agencies, including response teams” were already working in Tacloban. That day, responders had reached out to “the municipalities of Palo, Tanauan, and Dagami [and were] reporting that the damage in these areas is as severe as in Tacloban City.” UK and U.S. ships with helicopters were expected to arrive on November 15 to assist in the response. Over 380,000 people were in 1,215 evacuation centers across the nine affected regions on November 13, and those numbers were reduced overnight to 345,834 in 995 centers, with 575,378 staying with host families.

Humanitarian responders arriving in the impacted area are directed to check in with a Reception and Departure Center at the airport. A coordination meeting is scheduled for today, November 14, and an information management meeting will take place tomorrow, after that there will be daily meetings of donors.

OCHA will publish at least one more Situation Report, No. 15, tomorrow.

Haiyan in Vietnam

The impact of Haiyan in Vietnam was significantly less than predicted. According to the initial UN OCHA Situation Report, “Although the storm was initially expected to make landfall with high intensity, in turning northwards along the coast it weakened sufficiently offshore,” to arrive as a Category 1 Typhoon as compared with its Category 5 intensity in the Philippines.

OCHA Situation Report No. 2, published on ReliefWeb on November 13, is the final report for the emergency. That report indicates that Quang Ninh is the hardest hit of the northern provinces of Vietnam. Figures supplied to OCHA by the Vietnam National Search and Rescue organization (VINASARCOM) counted 14 fatalities and two people missing, 89 injuries, and 75 houses collapsed, with an additional 2,526 houses damaged. The report also says that “international stakeholders will not implement any specific response activity” for Haiyan, but will maintain their focus on relief related to Typhoons Wutip and Nari, which impacted Vietnam on September and October, respectively. Reports on these storms are consolidated on the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System (GDACS): Wutip, Nari.

Current Hazard Warnings

EarthquakeRussia (6.6)

High Surf: United States (Hawaii)

Flood: Australia (Tasmania, Victoria), Guatemala

Severe Weather: Canada (Yukon), Malaysia

Tropical Storm: Haiyan (Response)

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